Help needed to better understand York’s flooded historic buildings in 2015

As well as the devastating effect on local people and businesses, the 2015 Boxing Day floods in York had a serious impact on our historic buildings and heritage. Some of this damage could have been avoided with the right action before, during and afterwards.

RESEARCH

As well as needing to better understand how flooding can be managed in the city in the future, is also important to use the experiences of 2015 to form a better understanding of how flooding affects the material and structures of our historic buildings in York and the communities who live in them.

Alessandra Sprega, a conservation architect who is currently researching post natural disaster recovery of cultural heritage for a PhD in Conservation Studies in the University of York, is currently conducting this line of research.

Alessandra’s study responds to the urgent need to investigate how we can improve the resilience of York’s historic buildings to flooding by working with local community knowledge and experience. Its ultimate objective is to inform and involve York citizens and practitioners to create a more resilient historic city to cope with the threat of flooding.

QUESTIONNAIRE

In order to be able to achieve these aims, Alessandra is appealing to York residents aged 18+ who live in a historic building and experienced the 2015 flood to complete an online questionnaire titled “Mapping the resilience of York’s historic buildings after the 2015 flood”.

Your knowledge and perceptions will help to map the resilience of the historic centre of York by highlighting effective approaches and measures to recover and prepare buildings for future flooding.

The questionnaire, which takes about 10 minutes to complete, can be found here: https://goo.gl/forms/C5gVBLyczkHvIOaZ2

If you have any questions regarding the survey or would like to know more about the project please contact Alessandra Sprega directly, who will be pleased to answer any queries you have about this research: buildingyorkresilience@gmail.com

 

Resilient York conference material added

The Resilient York website now features a range of new material from the 2016 Resilient York conference.

New Material

New material includes: a review of the conference; a summary review of the roundtable debate, which concluded the conference, and a review of the written feedback questionnaire distributed during the conference.

These reviews can all be downloaded as pdfs, and they also give a pointer towards where Resilient York aims to take forth the outcome of the conference as a range of ‘next steps’ – more of which will be announced shortly.

Archive

The new Resilient York website also acts as an archive of the 2016 conference. Conference material to be found on the website includes the programme; downloadable pdfs of the conference speakers’ presentations; presenters’ abstracts and short biographies, as well as a photo gallery of the conference.

New Historic England article on flooding

An interesting new Historic England blog series has been written by Hannah Fluck on ‘A Changing Climate: Water flooding & Historic Buildings’ as part of their ‘Heritage Calling’ series.

The article includes reference to York’s Merchant Adventurers’ Hall 2015 Boxing Day flooding.

 screen-shot-2016-12-12-at-13-38-39Hannah, who was a welcome and active participant in the roundtable discussion at the 2016 Resilient York conference, argues in her blog article that the material components of historic buildings are usually more able to ride out flood damage than modern-built buildings. Today we put too much hope and effort on trying to make buildings air- and watertight; a fool’s errand. In comparison, historic buildings were built using permeable materials and, in certain locations, accepted that occasional contact with flood water was to be expected.

You can read Hannah’s article on Historic England‘s Heritage Calling webpage.


‘A Changing Climate: Water flooding & Historic Buildings’ article

An interesting new Historic England blog series has been written by Hannah Fluck on ‘A Changing Climate: Water flooding & Historic Buildings’ as part of their ‘Heritage Calling’ series.
screen-shot-2016-12-12-at-13-38-39
 
The article includes reference to York’s Merchant Adventurers’ Hall 2015 Boxing Day flooding.

Hannah, who was a welcome and active participant in the roundtable discussion at the 2016 Resilient York conference, argues in her blog article that the material components of historic buildings are usually more able to ride out flood damage than modern-built buildings. Today we put too much hope and effort on trying to make buildings air- and watertight; a fool’s errand. In comparison, historic buildings were built using permeable materials and, in certain locations, accepted that occasional contact with flood water was to be expected.

 
You can read Hannah’s article on Historic England‘s Heritage Calling webpage.

York’s 5-year flood defence plan on show

The Environment Agency is inviting members of the public, businesses, and organisations in York to come and see their plans to reduce the risk of flooding for York over the next 5 years via a ‘drop-in’ session.

You will also have chance to get the latest updates on their work at the Foss Barrier and to help better prepare yourself for the risk of flooding.

These plans come on the back of the £45m that has been made available by the government to the city following the Boxing Day floods in 2015.

The public ‘drop-in’ event is free, open to all, and will be held at Hotel 53, Piccadilly, on Friday 25 November, 12 – 7pm and Saturday 26 November, 10am – 5pm.

The Environment Agency will also be tweeting about it @EnvAgencyYNE.

drop-in-november-poster pdf

drop-in-november-poster

For further details on the Environment Agency’s plans in York, see the 13-page pdf document available via the gov.uk website.

 

 

Resilient York conference programme now available

We are delighted to announce that the Resilient York: sustaining an historic city through flooding and beyond day conference programme has now been finalised.
A pdf copy can be downloaded using the following link: Resilient-York-Conference-Programme-Nov-2016 (although a paper copy will be available on the day of the conference).